visualization software lets customers see finished work

Angie takes care of the sales, and Travis builds the frames.

Customers bring a photograph or a piece of artwork into the store, and Angie Robbins places it on a table.

A camera hanging from the ceiling snaps a picture of the piece, and Robbins uses visualization software to show the customer various mat colors and frame moldings available.

“We can do a real multitude of different things,” Robbins said. “(The shop) is very unique in that way.”

If a customer doesn’t like the color of the mat, or isn’t too crazy about the frame molding,big49erssanfrancisco Robbins can change it.

She can show customers up to four different samples at a time, and she said she and Travis will spend as much time with a customer as needed until they find the perfect frame.

“Whenever we do anything on here it’s a deal closer,” she said.

It usually takes about two weeks for the Robbinses to finish a piece, but it could be sooner if the materials they order come in quickly or if a customer chooses to use materials that are in stock in the store.

“We suggest quality work,” Robbins said. “And we never send our work out. It’s all done right here.”

And Travis Robbins does his best to make sure every part of the frame both the back and the front are high quality.

“It’s that important to me that the back looks good too,” he said, pointing out that the back is so solid that no one can poke their fingers through it. “Nobody’s going to see it once it’s sitting on the wall,http://www.big49erssanfrancisco.com but I want it to look good.”

They use all acid free materials when framing pieces, and suggest using conservation glass, which blocks out most of the sun’s harmful rays, to protect the photographs and artwork.

That’s important, because according to the , acid in standard mat boards and mounting boards made of wood pulp paper, which inherently contains acid can be a major source of damage to your framed art and memorabilia.

They’ve framed everything from football jerseys to samurai swords to turkeys, and Angie Robbins said they approach every project as though it was something they were framing for themselves.

“If you’re not happy with a job, we want to know it and we want to know what we can do to make it better,” she said. “We take special good care of people’s work.”